Patrick Lamber

Patrick Lamber - Jan 9, 2018 - Follow          
Technical consultant and Office Server and Services MVP.

Getting started with the Graph API and PowerShell

The post "Getting started with the Graph API and PowerShell" is a post of a post series. Find below all posts associated to this post series.
by Patrick Lamber on Jan 9, 2018
Filed under: Graph API Scripts Office 365
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The Microsoft Graph API is used to connect to the data that drives productivity such as mail, calendar, contacts, documents, directory, devices, and more through a unified endpoint accessible through REST. The API can be used to build productivity apps, governance solutions, or to perform automation/maintenance activities towards these assets in the organization. You can get started with the graph API here.

As a developer or IT pro you can start consuming the Graph API endpoints on your Office 365 tenant. The responses provided by the API is in JSON format. A good starting point to learn how to consume some of the endpoints without worrying to much on the authorization part is certainly the Graph Explorer.

You can use the explorer to learn how to perform some basic activities towards sample data (if you do not authenticate) or towards your tenant if you authenticate with your credentials.

You can find the documentation of the available Graph API endpoints with the required permissions here. You can use this documentation to play around with the Graph Explorer or in your scripts.

Now let us focus on the things that matter when consuming the Graph API with your PowerShell scripts. The next posts will explain how to authenticate towards the Graph API when accessing your data. Once this part is solved, you can start to write your PowerShell script and perform the desired operations.

by Patrick Lamber on Jan 9, 2018
Filed under: Graph API Scripts Office 365
Share it:
The post "Getting started with the Graph API and PowerShell" is a post of a post series. Find below all posts associated to this post series.